Pier B Replacement, P-356
U.S. Navy
Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, WA

Construction Cost: $142 Million

Design/Build Project Delivery

The new state-of-the-art pier is now capable of serving the current class as well as future class CVNs, which demand twice the electrical power at three times the voltage.


In order to serve the current Nimitz class nuclear aircraft carriers (CVNs) as well as the future class vessels, Naval Base Kitsap’s Pier B was demolished and replaced with a new state-of-the-art, 1,325-foot long by 120-foot wide concrete pier. Wood Harbinger provided rigorous and well-researched mechanical and electrical design for the extensive changes required by this upgrade.

The future class CVN’s demand twice the electrical power at three times the voltage, which meant major modifications to the upland underground medium voltage distribution and mechanical utilities at Pier B. Several other Navy facilities face the same challenging service demand changes, and Wood Harbinger investigated other upgrade attempts to provide a uniform approach solution to this larger scale issue.

Electrical upgrades included a new 60 MVA, 34.5 kV/13.8 kV/4.16 kV substation, a new generation of shore power mounds and substations, and changes and rerouting of the cross-base 34.5kV distribution feeders between substations FG and H to the new 34.5kV substation.

Mechanical utilities distribution for pier and shore-side systems included collection, holding, and transfer (CHT) (septic sewage/saltwater mixture) systems, fresh water supply systems, storm drainage systems, pure water, steam and pumped condensate systems, compressed air distribution systems, and associated appurtenances.

The future Class CVNs electrical requirements dictated a new 60 MVA, 34.5 kV/13.8 kV/4.16 kV substation and a new generation of shore-power mounds and substations. The upgrades required changes and rerouting of the cross-base 34.5kV distribution feeders between substations FG and H to the new 34.5kV substation. Substation 73 was replaced with a substation capable of supplying two CVNs with 13.8kV and 4.16kV shore power during maintenance. 34.5 kV/480V substations and distribution was required for AOE and SSBN shore power and industrial power to support maintenance/repair operations.

The mechanical distribution of pier and shore-side utility systems included: collection, holding, and transfer (CHT) (septic sewage/saltwater mixture) systems, fresh water supply systems, storm drainage systems, pure water, steam and pumped condensate systems, compressed air distribution systems, and associated appurtenances. The new water and CHT systems were integrated with the existing systems. We added fresh water piping and utility connections along the waterfront, and provided drainable spill containment curbing for any drips occurring during hose disconnection. The steam and pumped condensate piping system was also integrated with the existing utilities. Steam piping was routed in a trench including an existing 4 inch pure water converted to a high pressure return steam pipe. Steam utility connections including steam, high pressure return, and pumped condensate were provided along the pier. The compressed air system was routed in a mechanical vault and trenches, looped and connected to a new 10 inch compressed air main. The compressed air risers along the waterfront included outlets for ship service connection.